Aqueduct

"Aqueduct, (Latin: aqua + ducere, “to lead water”) man-made conduit for carrying water. In a restricted sense, aqueducts are structures used to conduct a water stream across a hollow or valley. In modern engineering, however, aqueduct refers to a system of pipes, ditches, canals, tunnels, and supporting structures used to convey water from its source to its main distribution point. Such systems generally are used to supply cities and agricultural lands with water. Aqueducts have been important particularly for the development of areas with limited direct access to freshwater sources. Historically, aqueducts helped keep drinking water free of human waste and other contamination and thus greatly improved public health in cities with primitive sewerage systems." (Encyclopedia Britannica, 2019)

Sources

Encyclopedia Britannica. 2019. Entry: Aqueduct (Engineering). Accessed March 13, 2019. Available at: https://www.britannica.com/technology/aqueduct-engineering 

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Women, water and space: The first geospatial rally for women in rural aqueducts

Can you imagine a group of young women empowering other women using geospatial technology? From July 10 to 13 July 2019 in the First Geospatial Rally for Women in Rural Aqueducts took place, where 30 women from very different contexts met with the same goal, to build an empowering space, in the Nicoya Campus (north of Costa Rica) of the University of Costa Rica (UCR). This was done with the intention to learn from each other.