SDG 1 - No Poverty

SDG 1

End poverty in all its forms everywhere

While global poverty rates have been cut by more than half since 2000, one in ten people in developing regions are still living with their families on less than the international poverty line of US$1.90 a day, and there are millions more who make little more than this daily amount. Significant progress has been made in many countries within Eastern and Southeastern Asia, but up to 42% of the population in Sub-Saharan Africa continues to live below the poverty line.

Poverty is more than the lack of income and resources to ensure a sustainable livelihood. Its manifestations include hunger and malnutrition, limited access to education and other basic services, social discrimination and exclusion as well as the lack of participation in decision-making.

Economic growth must be inclusive to provide sustainable jobs and promote equality. Social protection systems need to be implemented to help alleviate the suffering of disaster-prone countries and provide support in the face of great economic risks. These systems will help strengthen responses by afflicted populations to unexpected economic losses during disasters and will eventually help to end extreme poverty in the most impoverished areas.

Facts and Figures

  • 783 million people live below the international poverty line of US$1.90 a day
  • In 2016, almost 10 per cent of the world’s workers live with their families on less than US$1.90 per person per day
  • Globally, there are 122 women aged 25 to 34 living in extreme poverty for every 100 men of the same age group.
  • Most people living below the poverty line belong to two regions: Southern Asia and sub-Saharan Africa
  • High poverty rates are often found in small, fragile and conflict-affected countries
  • One in four children under age five in the world has inadequate height for his or her age
  • As of 2016, only 45% of the world’s population were effectively covered by at least one social protection cash benefit.
  • In 2017, economic losses due to disasters, including three major hurricanes in the USA and the Caribbean, were estimated at over $300 billion.

Space-based Technologies for SDG 1

Climate-related extreme events and other disasters can plunge communities into poverty. Space-based technologies can contribute to all phases of the disaster management cycle, including prevention, preparedness, early warning, response and reconstruction. Space-based technologies can contribute to all phases of the disaster management cycle, including prevention, preparedness, early warning, response and reconstruction. UNOOSA helps vulnerable communities access space technology to build their resilience and reduce their exposure and vulnerability to environmental shocks and disasters. Read more here.

SDG 1 Targets

Learn more about the SDGs

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