SDG 17 - Partnerships for the goals

SDG 17

Revitalize the global partnership for sustainable development

A successful sustainable development agenda requires partnerships between governments, the private sector and civil society. These inclusive partnerships built upon principles and values, a shared vision, and shared goals that place people and the planet at the centre, are needed at the global, regional, national and local level.

Urgent action is needed to mobilize, redirect and unlock the transformative power of trillions of dollars of private resources to deliver on sustainable development objectives. Long-term investments, including foreign direct investment, are needed in critical sectors, especially in developing countries. These include sustainable energy, infrastructure and transport, as well as information and communications technologies. The public sector will need to set a clear direction. Review and monitoring frameworks, regulations and incentive structures that enable such investments must be retooled to attract investments and reinforce sustainable development. National oversight mechanisms such as supreme audit institutions and oversight functions by legislatures should be strengthened.

Facts and Figures

 

  • Official development assistance stood at $135.2 billion in 2014, the highest level ever recorded
  • 79 per cent of imports from developing countries enter developed countries duty-free
  • The debt burden on developing countries remains stable at about 3 per cent of export revenue
  • The number of Internet users in Africa almost doubled in the past four years
  • 30 per cent of the world’s youth are digital natives, active online for at least five years
  • But more four billion people do not use the Internet, and 90 per cent of them are from the developing world

Space-based Technologies for SDG 17

Interdisciplinary and inter-sectoral partnerships can open new opportunities in space exploration and innovation, especially for developing countries. UNOOSA partners with entities from across all sectors to brings the benefits of space to everyone, everywhere. UNOOSA collaborates with UN Member States and entities, intergovernmental organizations, private firms in the space sector, academia and non-profit organisations for leveraging the benefits of space for all 17 SDGs. Read more here.
 

Learn more about the SDGs

Related Content

Software/Tool/(Web-)App

ISME-HYDRO Software/Tool/(Web-)App

ISME-HYDRO

ISME-HYDRO is a platform that helps monitor water resources of dams, thus enabling water resources managers to better execute their duties. It employs linked data infrastructure integrating in-situ measurements, satellite data, GIS data, domain knowledge, deep learning, and provides capabilities of forecasting of water volumes, of alerting for hazardous situations, of interaction with the data through four kinds of search and GIS interactivity. The platform is easily extendable and customizable.

Event

Article

Report on the Status and outlook of the Space4Water Project

The status and outlook of the Space4Water Project was presented at the 58th session of the Scientific and Technical Subcommittee (STSC) 2021 of the United Nations Office for Outer Space Affairs. The report is critical for outlining the motivation behind, contribution, and success of the Space4Water Project, and the Space4Water Portal as its main pillar.

A Better World Volume 7: Space4Water Feature

The United Nations Office for Outer Space Affairs together with its donor, the Prince Sultan Abdulaziz International Prize for Water have jointly published an article called Cooperation in applying space technologies to water management, in the 7th edtion of A Better World.

UNOOSA and Prince Sultan Bin Abdulaziz International Prize for Water reinforce their cooperation to promote use of space applications for water sustainability

VIENNA, 21 January (United Nations Information Service) - The United Nations Office for Outer Space Affairs (UNOOSA) and the Prince Sultan Bin Abdulaziz International Prize for Water (PSIPW) have renewed their long-standing agreement to promote the use of space-based technology for better water resource management.  PSIPW is a leading scientific award that focuses on innovation to address water scarcity, offered every two years.

Women, water and space: The first geospatial rally for women in rural aqueducts

Can you imagine a group of young women empowering other women using geospatial technology? From July 10 to 13 July 2019 in the First Geospatial Rally for Women in Rural Aqueducts took place, where 30 women from very different contexts met with the same goal, to build an empowering space, in the Nicoya Campus (north of Costa Rica) of the University of Costa Rica (UCR). This was done with the intention to learn from each other.

Why geospatial standards matter: Benefits and challenges of EO data standardization

Even 115 years later, the Great Baltimore Fire—which burned down much of the city of Baltimore in the United States—still carries important lessons in standardization. Firefighters from hundreds of kilometres away were sent to assist in putting out the fire, but they could do little to help because their hose couplings did not fit Baltimore’s fire hydrants – meaning, the fire hoses were not standardized. The lack of standardization turned hundreds of firefighters into spectators as the city burned (OGC, ISO & IH, 2018, p.