Vibrio

"Vibrio, (genus Vibrio), any of a group of comma-shaped bacteria in the family Vibrionaceae. Vibrios are aquatic microorganisms, some species of which cause serious diseases in humans and other animals.

Vibrios are microbiologically characterized as gram-negative, highly motile, facultative anaerobes (not requiring oxygen), with one to three whiplike flagella at one end. Their cells are curved rods 0.5 μm (micrometre; 1 μm = 10-6 metre) across and 1.5 to 3.0 μm long, single or strung together in S-shapes or spirals.

Three species of vibrio are of significance to humans: V. cholerae is the cause of cholera, and V. parahaemolyticus and V. vulnificus both act as agents of acute enteritis, or bacterial diarrhea. V. anguillarum is found in diseased eels and other fishes." (Britannica 2019)

Sources

Britannica, T. Editors of Encyclopaedia. "Vibrio." Encyclopedia Britannica, February 11, 2019. https://www.britannica.com/science/vibrio.

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