Cholera

"Cholera is an acute diarrhoeal infection caused by ingestion of food or water contaminated with the bacterium Vibrio cholerae. Cholera remains a global threat to public health and an indicator of inequity and lack of social development. Researchers have estimated that every year, there are roughly 1.3 to 4.0 million cases, and 21 000 to 143 000 deaths worldwide due to cholera." (Ali 2015)

 

 

Sources

Ali, Mohammad, Allyson R. Nelson, Anna Lena Lopez, and David A. Sack. 2015. “Updated Global Burden of Cholera in Endemic Countries.” Edited by Justin V. Remais. PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases 9 (6). https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pntd.0003832.

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