Earth Observation

“Earth observation is the gathering of information about planet Earth’s physical, chemical and biological systems. It involves monitoring and assessing the status of, and changes in, the natural and man-made environment. In recent years, Earth observation has become more and more sophisticated with the development of remote-sensing satellites and increasingly high-tech “in-situ” instruments. Today’s Earth observation instruments include floating buoys for monitoring ocean currents, temperature and salinity; land stations that record air quality and rainwater trends; sonar and radar for estimating fish and bird populations; seismic and Global Positioning System (GPS) stations; and over 60 high-tech environmental satellites that scan the Earth from space.” (Group on Earth Observations, 2018).

 

Sources

"FAQ". Group on Earth Observations, Group on Earth Observations. 2019.
http://www.earthobservations.org/g_faq.html.
Accessed February 14, 2019.

 

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